Welcome to the website of the
DERMATOLOGICAL
PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY

Dedicated to advancing the art and science
of dermatological photography




DPS BULLETIN BOARD
Posted January 12, 2004


DPS BREAKFAST AT AAD TO FEATURE
DERMATOLOGY PHOTO "HOT TOPICS"


Presentations with Punch: Putting the Power in your PowerPoint
Digital Dilemma: Point  &  Shoot vs. SLR - getting the most from your camera


This year’s Dermatological Photographic Society breakfast meeting and program at the American Academy of Dermatology, Washington, D.C., promises to be one of the best ever, with a “Double-Bill” of presentations for dermatologists and related medical personnel interested in staying up to date with clinical photography techniques and technologies.

The keynote address “Presentations with Punch: Putting the Power in your PowerPoint” will be given by William K. “Bill” Witmer of Slue-Witmer Skin Imaging Centers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and former director of clinical photography for dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

With PowerPoint now the standard platform in use for meetings, Bill Witmer’s talk will focus on the essential, proven requirements for successful electronic presentations.

An additional presentation on “Digital Dilemma: Point & Shoot vs. SLR—getting the most from your camera” will be made by DPS President William E. “Bill” Slue, Jr, chief of photography and a member of the dermatology faculty at New York University Skin and Cancer Unit in New York City.

Both of this year’s program topics were selected based on information received from the DPS Clinical Photography Survey 2003, with a high percentage of respondents interested in presentation tips for use with PowerPoint as well as requests for specific clinical photographic techniques and the use of digital cameras for dermatological photography.

The society’s photo survey was mailed to dermatologists nationwide in last spring’s DPS Newsletter. The survey results will be used in planning future programs and service projects of the society.

Speakers Bill Witmer and Bill Slue pioneered the medical procedure of Total Body Photography for early detection of melanoma.

With over 60 years combined medical photography experience at New York University Medical Center and University of Pennsylvania Medical System, Slue and Witmer have published and lectured extensively on Total Body Photography, dermatological photography, and the use of digital imaging in the clinical environment.


DERMATOLOGICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
AAD BREAKFAST MEETING
REGISTRATION  &  PROGRAM INFORMATION


The Dermatological Photographic Society Breakfast Meeting provides an opportunity to learn of the latest developments, tools and techniques in dermatological photography. Plan to enjoy an enlightening program and a continental breakfast with your peers.

Who should attend: Dermatologists and related medical personnel interested in improving their clinical photography knowledge and skills.

Keynote address: “Presentations with Punch: Putting the Power in your PowerPoint” by William K. Witmer, Slue-Witmer Skin Imaging Centers, Philadelphia, PA, and former director of clinical photography for dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Also: “Digital Dilemma: Point  &  Shoot vs. SLR—getting the most from your camera” by William E. Slue, Jr., president, Dermatological Photographic Society and chief of photography and member of the dermatology faculty at New York University Skin and Cancer Unit in New York City.

Monday, February 9, 2004

Sign-in starts 6:45 a.m.

Breakfast   &   Program: 7:15-8:30 a.m.

Grand Hyatt Washington

Room: Constitution DE

A continental breakfast buffet is included.
Registrations must be received by January 30. Seating is limited to space available, thus early registration is encouraged. After January 30, please call phone number below for space availability. Cost is $34 per person.

To register, please fill out and fax the registration form available on the DPS website for download, printout or for email to another interested individual, and also available in the DPS Newsletter-Winter 2004.

Fill out the appropriate registration information and fax to 973-276-0339.

To register by phone, please call 800-815-4330 or 973-276-0336 and ask for DPS Breakfast Registration at extension 513.

Processing of registrations is being provided as a service to the Dermatological Photographic Society by Canfield Imaging Systems.


PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE:
SOCIETY NOTES UPSWING IN CLINICAL PHOTO
INTEREST, LOOKS TO FUTURE PROJECTS


As we enter the new year, the Dermatological Photographic Society notes the increasing interest among dermatologists in using digital technologies for both taking clinical photos and using digital images in presentations to peers and the public.

While digital technologies bring expanded benefits, the many options available can also result in images and presentations which fall far shy of the superior clinical imaging which the society seeks to promote.

With that in mind, this year’s breakfast program focuses on getting the best from digital cameras and PowerPoints. Additionally, the society seeks your input in the planning stage of establishing photo standards for dermatology.

Lastly, my personal thanks to Tom Russell for all his assistance as I move into the leadership role of this great organization.

-- William E. Slue, Jr., DPS President


ABOUT THE DERMATOLOGICAL
PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY...


Formed in 1982, the purpose of the Dermatological Photographic Society (DPS) is to advance the art and science of dermatological photography through educational activities such as meetings and workshops on medical photography, publication and distribution of dermatological photography guides and articles, and related educational projects.

The Dermatological Photographic Society sponsors activities and publications for dermatologists interested in learning about or improving their use of clinical photography.

MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

The society is open to Dermatologists and associated colleagues with an interest in dermatological photography. For more information please view our web site:

www.DermPhotoSoc.org

or contact:

William E. Slue, Jr.
Dermatological Photographic Society
304 Luhmann Drive
New Milford, NJ 07646
or phone 201-986-1665

ORGANIZATION'S ORIGINS AND FIRST MEETING
RECALLED: TWENTY-TWO YEARS OF DPS PROGRAMS
&  SERVICE

Attendees at the first meeting of the Dermatological Photographic Society in this 1982 photo taken by Thalia Swinyer, were, from left, front row, Jerry Wachs, Jim Bard, Vincent Peng, Ken Gross, Len Swinyer, Tom Alt, Paul Lucky, Jack Seben; back row, Tom Russell, Nyles Esksritt, Ed Carmick, Tin Eng, Glenn Sondag, Leonard Snider, Stanford Lamberg, Paul Vandersteen, Jim Rasmussen and William Keenan. Charter members John Weiss, Jeff Callan, and Jere Guin had conflicts and were unable to attend.

With a history of providing service projects and informational programs, the Dermatological Photographic Society this year hosts its twenty-second DPS Breakfast Meeting & Program at the AAD. Founding member and past-president Tom Russell recalls the origins of the society and its first meeting.

The organizational meeting of the Dermatological Photographic Society was held on Tuesday, December 7, 1982, in the Norwich Room of the New Orleans Hilton in conjunction with the AAD annual meeting. It was the result of discussions among Leonard Swinyer of Salt Lake City, John Weiss, at that time located in Chicago, and Tom Russell from Milwaukee, who all believed an organization promoting the art of photography in dermatology would be of value for our profession. Annual breakfast meetings have been held since that time in conjunction with the AAD convention.

Len and Tom selected the name and included “society” which was thought to invoke the cachet of a venerable academic organization. Considerable effort was expended in the use of dermatological rather than dermatologic. A retired professor of classic languages, Ransom Taylor, rendered a three-page opinion, delving into Indo-European word roots, in which he opted for Dermatologico-Photographic Society, but thought our own choice was quite acceptable. The founding executive committee submitted our opinion to the charter members who voted to accept it. Len Swinyer was elected the first president and Tom Russell designated secretary/treasurer, a role he has maintained for more than two decades.

The adjective enhanced breakfast menu consisted of “fluffy scrambled eggs with crisp bacon strips, buttered hominy grits and hash browned potatoes.” Some of the attendees alluded to it as one small step for derm photography and another for arteriosclerosis. Dan Siegel, when president, initiated the “heart healthy” breakfast of fruit, juices, yogurt, and assorted muffins, etc., which has become our traditional buffet.


THE DPS EXPRESSES APPRECIATION
TO THE FOLLOWING SUPPORTERS:


FUJISAWA HEALTHCARE, INC

DELASCO

CANFIELD IMAGING SYSTEMS


DPS CLINICAL PHOTOGRAPHY SURVEY

Results from the Dermatological Photographic Society’s Clinical Photography Survey of attendees at the 2003 AAD Breakfast Program showed very high interest in digital imaging, with some 70% of the approximately 100 attendees already using digital cameras in their practices, while nearly all remaining attendees were seriously considering adding digital capability for their clinical photography.

Highest interest was expressed by over two-thirds of attendees for information on photo techniques, digital cameras, use of PowerPoint for presentations, and image management, while information in Whole Body Photography was requested by 40% of attendees, followed by UV photography at 30%, dermoscopy at 26%, advanced image analysis at 22%, and cosmetic simulation at 18%.

Primary use of clinical photography was for documentation at 94%, followed by teaching/lectures/presentations at 64%, and patient education at 30%.

Information from the survey is being used in planning future programs and activities by the Dermatological Photographic Society.


DPS SEEKS PHYSICIAN INPUT FOR USE IN PLANNING
DERMATOLOGICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC STANDARDS


The Dermatological Photographic Society is requesting suggestions and input for use in planning a society sponsored guide for dermatological photographic standards.

To be published by the DPS, the guide would serve as a reference for obtaining standardized photography for dermatology. The guide would address the need for consistency in use of camera, lighting, magnification, framing, patient positioning and patient preparation, and would include both visual examples and explanatory text.

Communications from physicians and medical professionals engaged in dermatological photography are requested and should be sent to:

William E. Slue, Jr.
Dermatological Photographic Society – Photo Standards
304 Luhmann Drive
New Milford, NJ 07646

email: B.Slue@SlueWitmer.com

phone: 201-986-1665


A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO
FUJISAWA HEALTHCARE, INC.


The Dermatological Photographic Society extends its appreciation to Fujisawa Healthcare, Inc., for an educational grant funding the 2003 publication and distribution of:

The DPS Imaging Resource Kit for Dermatology

and the

Retrieval System for Dermatological Photographs, 4th Edition


WHOLE BODY PHOTOGRAPHY: CPT CODE UPDATE

Whole Body Photography (WBP) continues to gain acceptance among dermatologists as a valuable tool for patients at risk for melanoma.

The leading cancer centers, more than sixty percent of dermatology academic centers and more than fifty percent of dermatologists now use some form of WBP for surveillance of patients at high risk for developing melanoma, according to Thomas W. Bialoglow, product manager for DermaGraphix with Canfield Imaging Systems.

Additionally, in July of 2002, the AMA issued two CPT III codes for Whole Body Integumentary Photography, codes 0044T and 0045T, Bialoglow said, noting that the code designations are a part of the approval process for recognition of Whole Body Photography as a reimbursable procedure.

Code 0044T is meant for patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome or a familial history of melanoma. Code 0045T is meant for patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome or a personal history of melanoma.

Category III CPT codes are temporary codes for “new and emerging technologies” and are established to permit data collection regarding the prevalence and distribution of the procedure. A CPT III does not obligate insurers to pay for the procedure but is certainly a step in that direction, Bialoglow said.


GUESTS FROM ISDIS TO ATTEND
DPS BREAKFAST PROGRAM AT AAD


Attending this year’s Dermatological Photographic Society Breakfast Program are members of the International Society for Digital Imaging of Skin (ISDIS). Allan C. Halpern, MD, president of ISDIS, will make a brief presentation at the DPS Breakfast.

Founded in 1992, the ISDIS is made up of dermatologists interested in skin imaging, dermoscopy, teledermatology and magnetic resonance imaging. Under the leadership of Dr. Mathew Fleming, president, and Dr. Alexander Zemtsov, secretary-treasurer, the society partnered in 1995 with the International Society for Skin Imaging (ISSI) and the International Skin Bioengineering Society (ISBS) in launching the peer reviewed journal Skin Research and Technology (SRT) on biophysical methods and imaging techniques for noninvasive quantification of skin structure and functions. SRT is currently published by Blackwell Synergy.


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